Business in Vancouver: Up, Up and Away

London Drugs president Wynne Powell's travel schedule had him making five stops in one day for management meetings around B.C. and Alberta. 'I did all my meetings and I was back home that night,' he said of his journey to Prince George, Grande Prairie, Lethbridge, Medicine Hat and Calgary. That's the perk that comes with being president of London Air Services, a charter airline owned by London Drugs. "Can you imaging trying to do that same journey, waiting around hubs for connections?" he asked. "It's a three-day journey." As Powell recounted his journey, he explained that one of London Air's clients was on a similar four-stop trip. But Powell declines to name any clients, explaining that some feel safer when no one knows their travel itinerary, and others simply do not want to promote the image of extravagance commonly associated with charter-jet travel. Read full article (PDF)...
Read More

Business in Vancouver: Drugstore Cowboy May 2001

Wynne Powell becomes animated as he lifts the model of a Learjet 45 XR from the coffee table in his spacious Richmond office. His enthusiasm is infectious as he describes the jet's luxurious leather interior, its computer work stations and its ability to cruise at 51,000 feet, well above the riff-raff of commercial jetliners. Personal jets are only the latest of many product lines for Powell, president and chief operating officer of London Drugs. To be sure, you won't be seeing Learjets in your local London Drugs outlet anytime soon. London Air Service, which owns two Learjets that it charters to corporate and government clients (with a third on order), is a distinct company. But like London Drugs, it is a subsidiary of H.Y. Louie Co., B.C.'s, second-biggest private company behind The Jim Pattison Group. And like London Drugs, it is run by Powell, the company's president. Read full article (PDF) ...
Read More

BC Business: Jet set economics

Like almost anyone planning to take to the air this past summer, domestic business travellers have been forced to choose: take one airline that features two names, adiminishing level of service and a potential pilot strike, or drive to points south, where the skies open up a bit. The lack of competition hasn't done anything to lower airfares; with short-notice full rates becoming particularly prohibitive. Given that Canadian designer apparel darling Roots has pushed its planned entry into commercial aviation back to next spring, more than one company has begun to look at what was once considered the most decadent of lavish expenses, the corporate jet. Read full article (PDF)...
Read More